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Levi Jordan
Plantation

Grace Methodist Church History

excerpted from:

I heard it through the Grapevine: Oral Tradition in a Rural African American Community in Brazoria, Texas

by Cheryl Wright, University of Houston

Master's Degree Thesis

see also Family Names

GRACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH HISTORY

[provided to Cheryl Wright by Grace Methodist Church]]

"In 1870, a White minister representing the Methodist Episcopal church came to Brazoria County to work among the Negroes and to establish churches. This minister built his first small church in Brazoria on a lot given by the Perkin family. In 1871, this same minister came to the Jordan Plantation and organized the Grace Mission, and named it Grace Methodist Episcopal Church.

In 1871, the White minister brought his family south and moved in the home of Claiborne Holmes, one of the plantation ministers. In connection with the mission organization and its duties, the minister organized a night school for Negroes. He and his wife taught the classes both to adults and children.

The conference in the fall of 1875 moved the minister to Breen Hill, and the conference assigned the first Negro minister to Grace Church in the person of Reverend Logan Austin, an ex-soldier who had fought in the Union Army. In 1876, most of the people from the Jordan Plantation moved to the Mims Plantation where a colored school had been organized. The Trustees were contacted and allowed the members of the Grace Methodist Church to have church services in the school building. Services were held in the school quite successfully until early in 1884.

In 1884, Reverend Martin Mack secured the school for services for the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and the members of Grace were requested to find a new location. Having no definite place to worship, the membership became scattered. Mrs. Francis Green and Mrs. George Holmes, with tears in their eyes stated their plight to Reverend S.H. McNeal. The church again took on new life and during that year fourteen young people joined the Church. Grace Church occupied this log house until 1886.

In 1886, three acres of land were purchased in the Old Holland Sherman track, and Mr. I.H. Holmes, Sr., grandfather to Reverend McNeal built the first Grace Methodist church. During that period, the Presiding Elders were white.

Today, we feel proud that Grace Methodist Church, after many years of struggling still goes forward, and by the help of God we shall continue to use every channel possible to make this church an institution for the developing of Christian ideas and Principles."

(closing paragraph of the written church history)

 

Names on Cornerstone of GRACE METHODIST CHURCH

Rebuilt 1955 Louis Green-Pastor

Trustees

T. Mack, L. Holmes, S. Bivins, S. Alston, S. Lemmons, I. Holmes, D. Jones, S. Smith, R. Bivins

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Carol McDavid 1998